Latest Articles

Rabbets1

Rabbets, dadoes, and grooves are essential joints, used in most furniture and cabinet projects. They also rank among the easiest joints to make provided you have the right tools. So, if you’re fairly new to woodworking, or you need to brush up on your skills, here’s your chance to master these three “building block” joints and achieve cleaner,  more accurate cuts every time.

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Trout1

Whether you own a low-dough handheld rotary carving tool or one that features an easy-to-manage flex shaft, you’ll find this handsome plaque a joy to make, using our full-sized pattern and a few selected cutters.

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Fishermans1

When you enjoy something as much as fishing, it’s a shame to simply prop your favorite rods into a corner of the garage or basement. This accommodating stand lets you store up to 10 rods in style, and provides two generous drawers for reels, string spools, and other accessories. In fact, the two main drawers each hold three no. 3700 Plano boxes (a handy size for holding all your lures, hooks and weights), so that when the fish are biting you can grab the tackle you need and stash the stuff you don’t. There’s also a secret third drawer, but we can’t say more than that right now. Otherwise, it wouldn’t be much of a secret.

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Arbor1

Elegant design and rock-solid router-cut joinery combine to make this outdoor structure the envy of the neighborhood.

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Crossbracechair1

Two simple subassemblies, made from strong, rot-resistant white oak, add up to one comfortable seat that you can use indoors or out. For easy storage, simply slide out the seat/leg subassembly from the back/leg subassembly and slip it between the back rails of the back/leg subassembly. Make the two hardboard templates first, and employ them to build as many chairs as you like.

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1

Few of us ever admit to having “enough” tools and machinery, but sooner or later, we realize that it’s possible to own one too many. Finding parking spots for those most-needed machines, benches, stands, and materials in a crowded garage or basement can take the thrill out of making sawdust.

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Mishaps21 1

In mid-May 2006 I acquired a replica of a 300-year old hand tool that can be best described as a bent-knife with a 24" handle. It is what young Welsh men used to carve the bowl of their love spoons since the 17th century, resting the long handle on their shoulder as they pulled the curved blade through the wood towards them. As a modern-day love spoon carver who demonstrates the folk art at festivals and shows, I was very excited at the prospect of showing people how my ancestors performed their work using this most unusual tool.

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Yellowpoplar2

Yellow poplar (Liriodendron tulipifera, or tulip tree), the tallest hardwood tree in North America, also rates as the most valuable commercial species because its intolerance to shade stifles lower branches and produces a perfect, straight trunk with clear lumber even in small trees.

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For small glue jobs, I made this handy support to store my glue, glue brushes, and water. Storing the bottle upside down ensures that the glue is always ready at the first squeeze.

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This is the perfect tool for working shallow mortises such as hinge gains, inlay, or door locks. A recent addition to the Lie-Nielsen line, the No. 71 Router Plane is based loosely on an early Stanley model but with notable improvements. Blade depth is set with an adjustment knob for precise settings then locked in position with a second knob. This provides easy, micro adjustment for perfect fitting of hardware and proved critical when I needed to take just a hair out of a hinge gain. The blade is held in a square broached hole in the body for a solid, no-slop blade fit. 

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