Latest Articles

Shoulderplane1

Careful machining will get you close, but sometimes a joint needs a little help to get that perfect piston fit. For fine-tuning rabbets and truing tenons, you can’t beat a shoulder plane. Don’t have one? Don’t worry.


Read More >
Hallcombo1

Both decorative and functional, this hall mirror is more than a place to check your appearance before stepping out into the world. It also holds your keys and gloves on a shelf, and has hooks for hats, scarves, and coats.

Read More >
Mishaps 23 1

I was building rustic clocks for Christmas presents out of logs that were sawn in half but still about 4" thick. While routing mortises for the battery-powered clock movements I ran into a problem. 

Read More >
Maple1

When a woodworker’s mind turns to maple, it revives images of golden autumn hues, sweet syrup, and honey-colored country furniture. And why not? Fall foliage of the sugar maple (Acer saccharum) draws millions of leaf “peepers” to New England and the Great Lakes’ states each year.

Read More >

If you use books or magazines for reference when building a project in the shop, you know how quickly they can become victim to coffee spills, glue, sawdust, and more.

Read More >

Starrett’s new 5-in-1 Combination Protractor was designed to eliminate math and guesswork when cutting angles, and I had the perfect test—helping a friend trim out a fiberglass bathtub in the bathroom of his old farm house.

Read More >

While my bandsaw is regularly used for ripping and resawing, having the ability to use smaller blades would certainly increase the tool’s versatility. I prefer the bandsaw over a scrollsaw because it’s faster, capable of sawing thicker stock, and doesn’t pick up the wood and cause it to chatter in mid-cut. However, the problem with using narrow width blades on the bandsaw is that the blade’s teeth can get damaged the second you start the saw, if the metal guides are not set perfectly or mid way into a cut, should the blade deflect into the steel blocks. The Carter Stabilizer solves both problems.

Read More >
Squaringup1

Want to be a better woodworker? Start with better wood. Simple but true. The fact is that wood moves. After a few weeks (sometimes days) even the best boards can go bad.

Read More >
Blades1

Ever wonder if your table saw blade does what it’s supposed to? Sure, it “cuts,” but is it costing you needless aggravation and added machining? Are you becoming a master at fixing poorly fitting joints and cleaning up rough, burned cuts and tear-out? If so, you’re developing the wrong kind of woodworking habits and wasting valuable shop time. The problem may well be that you’re using the wrong blade.

Read More >
Workshop1

Roger McClure’s basement workshop is packed to the rafters (joists, actually) with tools and accessories, but that doesn’t prevent him from keeping a tidy shop. It’s all about using space wisely—and creatively.

Read More >

Top of Page