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Many woodworkers have a love/hate relationship with their air-powered (pneumatic) tools. They love the speed and convenience of brad nailers and staplers for cabinet assembly, but hate the time-consuming compressor setup/takedown procedure and hefting. 

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Clamprack1

Keeping your wide assortment of clamps in one place and near your assembly table or workbench is like herding cats. You may find your spring clamps in one corner of the shop, hand screws in another, your strap clamps in a drawer, and your bar clamps scattered all over. But with this mobile A-frame rack, you can stop the madness and keep everything within arm’s reach. 

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Tansu1

This stack of modular cabinets (or boxes) filled with drawers and sliding doors draws inspiration from tansu cabinets commonly found in peasant and artisan homes of 18th and 19th century Japan. Though most originals are simple cabinets that served utilitarian ends, they’ve come to be admired for their unique forms and joinery. This modern version serves as a woodworker’s take on the Japanese tansu called Kaidan-dansu, or stair chest; in place of heavy iron corners, hinges, and hardware, I’ve used all-wood joinery, as well as wood drawer slides and pulls.

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Brightideas1

To say sunglasses are a requirement for spending time in Mark Koritz’s workshop would be a stretch, but a bright space was a priority when Mark designed his 15×55' shop.

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Conventional router lifts provide decent bit adjustment, but most still leave you with an endless cranking chore when it’s time to switch bits. The Pinnacle Premium Router Quick-Lift is different. With a quarter-turn twist, the spring-assisted lift wrench releases and then helps support the carriage to make changing bits and resetting the rough bit depth a fast and smooth operation. 

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This classic cutter mounts on to your drill press and shaves away wood as it’s slid underneath. In addition to planing, the tool can cut rabbets and tenons, and perform a bunch of other specialized cuts. But in this age of affordable lunchbox planers and routers, does it still make the cut? And how safe is it to operate?

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Jewelrybox1

This beautiful box, with its spline-reinforced mitered corners, makes a great gift for that special person. Part of its beauty is that it’s easy to build and lets you display that stunning piece of figured wood you stashed away for just the right project. I used walnut for the box, and spalted sycamore for the top panel, bottom, and keys. Simple routed moldings serve as the feet. 

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Craftsmans1

Toolboxes take a world of abuse over the years. Corners encounter dings, sides get scratched, and joints bust apart if the box falls hard on an unforgiving concrete floor. That’s why the choices of wood and joint type are critical. 

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Displaycase1

This handsome display case inherits its good looks from Philadelphia furniture built during the Chippendale period (roughly 1760-1785). Classic architectural elements such as flutes, finials, and pediments, and balanced proportions played a huge role in the furniture of that time.

 
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Shellac1

Shellac’s many attributes have kept it near the top of the finishing charts for centuries, but the only way to understand why is to mix up a batch of flakes or crack open a can. In less time than it takes to read this story, you’ll see how this bug-borne resin adds color and highlights grain quite unlike its modern competition. With just a little practice, you will also discover how you can use this fast-drying film to produce a flawless finish in any workshop situation.

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