View a Larger Image of Trapper Two Blade Pocketknife for Hunting and Fishing - 6-7/8" - Unfinished Kit
View a Larger Image of Trapper Two Blade Pocketknife for Hunting and Fishing - 6-7/8" - Unfinished Kit
View a Larger Image of Trapper Two Blade Pocketknife for Hunting and Fishing - 6-7/8" - Unfinished Kit
  • View a Different Image of Trapper Two Blade Pocketknife for Hunting and Fishing - 6-7/8" - Unfinished Kit
  • View a Different Image of Trapper Two Blade Pocketknife for Hunting and Fishing - 6-7/8" - Unfinished Kit
  • View a Different Image of Trapper Two Blade Pocketknife for Hunting and Fishing - 6-7/8" - Unfinished Kit

WoodRiver

Trapper Two Blade Pocketknife for Hunting and Fishing - 6-7/8" - Unfinished Kit

$18.99

The Trapper, a member of the Jack Knife family, is one of the most classic and iconic pocketknife patterns. A Jack Knife is defined as a slip joint folder with two blades that both open from the same end of the handle. Blades of equal length are what distinguish a Trapper from other...

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The Trapper, a member of the Jack Knife family, is one of the most classic and iconic pocketknife patterns. A Jack Knife is defined as a slip joint folder with two blades that both open from the same end of the handle. Blades of equal length are what distinguish a Trapper from other Jack Knives. Our WoodRiver® Trapper Two-Blade Kit features a clip and spey pattern blade that measures 3-1/8" in overall length and is constructed from 7Cr17Mov (440A) stainless steel, which has been hollow ground and polished to a satin finish. Shape, mount and finish your custom handle for a truly one-of-a-kind, quality knife.

Features:


  • Use this kit to create a truly one-of-a-kind pocketknife
  • Two equal length blades
  • HRC56-58 hardness blade
  • Hollow ground and polished to a satin finish

Specifications:


  • Overall Length: 6-7/8"
  • Blade Length: 3-1/8"
  • Closed Length: 3-3/4"
  • Blade Construction: 7Cr17Mov (440A) stainless steel

What's Included:


  • (1) Blade
  • (4) Brass pins

Notes:


  • Scale material not included (sold separately)

Articles & Blogs

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At one time, every man in America worth a nickel had a pocketknife on him. “You never know when you might need it” was the philosophy, and a man always wanted to be prepared for any situation. There are still plenty of folks out there who consider a pocketknife as critical as a cell phone.

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Reviews

4.33 out of 5 stars
3 Reviews
  1. 3.0 out of 5 stars
    by on

    Good first-time knife kit, if...

    This is a good first-time knife kit, if you don't follow the instructions. I bought 5 of these kits to make as gifts. I tried the instructions on my first knife, though intuition told me it was all wrong. If you must read the instructions, if you are so OCD you can't resist, go ahead, then forget them. Follow your gut: You cannot shape the scales perfectly, glue them exactly in place, along with the pins, clamp it so the scales are tight to the liners and don't shift, and install the pins (not too deep now or the blade won't close), and hold everything perfectly in alignment while the 5 minute glue takes 2 hours to set up (at least, mine did; and 24 hours to harden). What you can do is cut the scales a bit oversized, rough shape them, and glue them in place. Then do your final shaping on the knife. Working carefully with a knife, rasps and files, refine the final shape. Don't worry about scratching the metal a little at this phase; you will remove those scratches as you do the final sanding. When the shaping is done, sand the whole works, including the German silver bolsters on the ends from P220 up to P1500. Then dig out your buffing wheels (you will need 3) and buff the whole thing with red rouge, white diamond, and Hut or whatever finish you prefer, changing the wheel each time. After the rouge and diamond, scrub the whole thing down with paint thinner or that black oxide from the metal becomes part of your finish. A tip for keeping those pins from going too deep: Cut off a scrap of UHMW plastic just thick enough to fit between the liners. Jam it in the slot before glueup, then insert the pins. After the glue sets you can pull it out. Leave some sticking out to grab onto, it may be a bit reluctant, but it will come out. (Pins are for looks, mostly, but help align the scales. You can leave them out.) The steel is 440A, not my favorite but good for wet locations. High in chromium it is considered a budget knife steel. Eh, for $20 and 3 hours, you can have a finished knife that is worth $20 and might bring out a little pride -- if you don't follow the instructions.

  2. 5.0 out of 5 stars
    by on

    First knife project

    I enjoy making unique cabinets, spice racks etc but always wanted to make something that requires forming, etc so decided that I would make one each for my son in-law and future son in-law for Christmas. first one took me 6 hours of careful paranoid oopsy work and the second took me about an hour and a half. I really enjoyed it and picked one piece of wood with a worm hole and the second with "veins" both from the same piece of wood which I can't remember what kind of wood it is. These are the knives I had as a child and still have fond memories of them and feel my son's will enjoy them also and remember me when I am gone.

  3. 5.0 out of 5 stars
    by on

    Great kit to jumpstart a knife making hobby

    I have finished two kits already, and now I’m hooked. These kits are beginner’s level difficulty which will leave you smiling when you’re finished. I’m about to purchase another one to complete before I move on to the next level of knife making.

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