Chomping Shark

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Shark

Just when you thought it was safe to go back in the toy box.

By David Wakefield

Overall dimensions: 121 ⁄8"l × 6"w × 33 ⁄4" h

As a toymaker, I continually strive to make my creations more than what most folks might expect from a block of wood. In order to do so, I often incorporate simple mechanisms to make my playthings come to life. The shark, a favorite subject, is a case in point. My ultimate predator employs hidden pegs that power its toothy chomp when it’s rolled about. I’ve designed several sharks over the years, but this version sports a sculpted–almost fluid–physique.

This toy may look menacing, but fear not: small fingers are perfectly safe. To ensure that your fingers are just as safe during construction, I’ve provided advice to help keep your digits away from both blades and bits while machining the small parts. Of course, if any step seems too close for comfort, stop and use another, safer method. For example, shaping parts with files and sanding blocks takes more time than using a router or belt sander, but the hand-tool approach is equally effective (and can be a suitable chore for young shop assistants)

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