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Item 424376
Model 725000K

Jet - ProShop II Table Saw with Cast Wings, 115V, 30" Rip

$1,499.99

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  • - Ships in 2-5 Business Days.

With the features you expect from a high-end cabinet saw, the Jet ProShop Table Saw is a compact design of a contactor-style machine. The transparent blade guard has independent leaves, and the...

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Details

With the features you expect from a high-end cabinet saw, the Jet ProShop Table Saw is a compact design of a contactor-style machine. The transparent blade guard has independent leaves, and the quick release riving knife reduces chance of kickback. A low profile riving knife is included. The arbor lock allows for quick and easy changing of blades.

Features:

  • Quick release riving knife for hassle free riving knife changes
  • Improved dust shroud around blade for better dust collection
  • Convenient, magnetic paddle switch for the safest operation possible
  • Innovative single belt design for easier belt tensioning and reduced vibration
  • Motor reset switch conveniently relocated to the power switch instead of the motor
  • Low profile riving knife included
  • Redesigned guard for better protection and ease of use
  • On board storage for all included accessories
  • CSA certified
  • Motor: 1-3/4 HP, 115 V, 14.8 A, 1 PH
  • Recommended Circuit Size (Amps.): 20
  • Dimensions (In.): 43 H x 60 L x 40 W
  • Table Height from Floor (In.): 34-3/4
  • Maximum Depth of Cut at 45 Degrees (In.): 2-1/8
  • Maximum Width of Dado (In.): 13/16
  • Table Size (L x W) (In.): 20 x 27
  • Table in Front of Saw Blade at Maximum Depth of Cut (In.): 8.81
  • Table Size with Extension (L x W) (In.): 44 x 27
  • Arbor Speed (RPM): 4000
  • Maximum Rip Left of Blade (In.): 13-1/2
  • Maximum Depth of Cut (In.): 3-1/8v
  • Miter Gauge Type: T-Slot with Stops
  • Table Type: Cast Iron
  • Arbor Diameter (In.): 5/8
  • Dust Collection Minimum CFM Required (CFM): 350
  • Maximum Rip Right of Blade (In.): 30
  • Maximum Diameter of Dado (In.): 8
  • Blade Diameter (In.): 10
  • Dust Port Outside Diameter (In.): 4
  • Gross Weight (lbs): 302
  • Net Weight (lbs): 276

Shipping / Billing Information

This product ships direct from the manufacturer:

  • Your order will ship in 2-5 business days.
  • This product is considered special order. Your account will be charged when you place your order.
  • Express or overnight shipping is not available for this product.
  • Ships by Ground to the 48 contiguous states. Cannot ship to Alaska, Hawaii, PO Boxes, APOs, US Territories, Canada or other foreign countries.

Return Information

All returns must be pre-approved. Any non-warranty returns must be unused and in original packaging. A 25% restock fee will apply. Customer pays return freight. Please call our Customer Service Dept. at 1-800-535-4482 with any return questions.

Warranty Information

Reviews

4.5 out of 5 stars
2 Reviews
  1. 4.0 out of 5 stars
    by on

    Good saw for me.

    I recently purchased this saw from my local Woodcraft retailer. They had one in stock and it was the floor model, I considered taking it but ultimately decided to let them order one for me. It arrived about 7 business days later and I went to pick it up. The staff at the store were remarkable, they were all very helpful and knowledgeable and were always willing to help with any questions I had during my first visit to look at the saws they had on hand. I would first like to state that the saw they had on display was a previous iteration of the Pro Shop II. The one I received was the latest iteration. The major difference between the two that I can notice is the dust collection. The updated model has a bottom dust collection plate and the dust port is on the bottom as well. The version in the store did not have a bottom plate and the dust port was located on the back side, on both versions a 2 inch dust hose is connected from the blade shroud to a four inch dust port. The dust port on the updated version is four inch as well, but also has openings to allow for collection of dust that escapes the shroud. The difference in the updated version and the version at the shop did cause a little bit of confusion for me as well as the employees. I was viewing the updated manual online which showed a bottom dust plate(as well as a side dust port), and the instruction manual for the floor model only showed a side dust port... it wasn't until later I saw the cover of the updated manual said "for serial no. 18061009 and higher". Jet's website even shows the dust port on the side of the saw at the time of this writing. Confusion aside I really liked the saw and the price was fair, apparently Woodcraft will honor the future sale price of 10% off up to 30 days before the official sale began. It was mid February when I purchased it and the sale began March 1. The saw came packaged in 4 separate boxes, the saw itself is on a small pallet, a box with the two wings, one for the fence, and one for the rails. Altogether weighing around 300 pounds. The saw itself came in at 206 with the legs and packaging. I was able to get it off my truck with the help of a friend. One of the reason I bought this saw over a cabinet saw was that I would occasionally need to move it and I wanted to be able to do so myself. Assembly was a little confusing due to the manual, even though I had the updated saw the manual included had not been updated, Jet did, however, include a one sheet addendum that included the bottom dust plate in the parts list. Still, the manual just seemed off. Putting the saw together was not much of an issue, but the manual seemed to be put together by cutting and pasting from older manuals from the Proshop One, pictures from the Exacta model, etc. The fence manual was written just as well as the saw manual, I ordered my saw with the 30 inch rails, but enough bolts and nuts were included for the 52 inch rails and extension table. The manual seemed to skip steps in a few places and if you're not paying attention you'll find yourself asking "why do I need to drill these holes?" The manual does not specify which steps are for which rails. But again... Assembly really isn't that difficult, I think the manuals actually slowed me down due to their inconsistency. Over all it took me and a friend about 3 hours to unload it, unpackaged it, and get it together, that includes aligning the wings properly with the table and making sure the fence rails were level across the table and wings. It came out beautifully, the table and wings were flush without much effort at all. I feel jet did an excellent job machining them. Calibration was much simpler than I expected. I went ahead and purchased a 12 inch Starrett combination square to assist me. The 0 and 45 bevel stops were dead on out of the box, I made no adjustments to them. The miter slot was as square to the blade as I could get using a combination square and marking a lucky tooth on the blade, I did not make any adjustments to the table, although it would be easy enough to do by loosening the three bolts that hold it on. I'm sure if I had a dial gauge to use for alignment I would find that it is off a few thousandths, but I don't have one. I was not as lucky when adjusting the fence for square, it was pretty off from the get go. Getting it set up was simple though, turning the two white screws on the fence will make it square to table, took a few tries but it went pretty quick once I figured out how much it'll move when I turn the screws. Same with making it parallel to the miter slot. I used my combination square again and easily lined it up with the edge of the rule at the front and back of the table. One thing I'm still fiddling with on the fence is the amount of pressure needed to fully lock the fence in place, you use the same set screws to adjust the pressure as you do to set it parallel to the miter slot. Out of the box the locking handle would just drop down without any effort, while this did keep the fence in place, a fair amount of force would cause it to move, I've been tightening and loosening over the past couple of days trying to find what I am happy with. The only issue I had with setup was the fence measuring scale on the rails. I've never been good at applying stickers or decals and I managed to give it a little curve up and down along the length of the rail. I have ordered another measuring scale from Jet, and will reapply using a few tricks that I picked up on the internet to hopefully help me get it on perfect. Now, for the fun part... Using the saw! I couldn't afford to do the nickel test, so I had to use a penny. I sat the penny on edge on the mail table, turned the saw on... It was a smooth and silent startup. The penny did not move. I placed the penny on the wings, turned the saw on, no movement. So, I guess, that takes care of that... Coming from the job site saw I used previously... I'm pretty impressed by the lack of vibration and how silently the motor runs. I cut a few small scraps of rough maple and plywood with the 40 tooth stock blade. It went through as expected with a comfortable feed rate, I tried pushing the wood faster than I normally would to check for belt slippage, I manage to only slightly slow the blade, but no slippage. I finally stopped playing and cut a 10x10 piece of plywood and all four edges were square with my combination square. Measuring in both directions was as dead on 10 inches as my eyes could see so it seems the saw came set as accurate as I would ever care to make it, except the fence, of course. I've been using the saw non stop for three days to build a small entry table out of maple and new plywood shop cabinets for my work area. I feel I've used enough to get an idea of how it's going to perform for me in the future. I'm only a hobby wood worker and don't have an unlimited budget. The saw fit my needs of being 115v, accurate, and hopefully long term reliable. At this saw's price point there were other options for more powerful full cabinet saws, but the brand that fits that description had some negative customer service reviews, as well as negative issues with shipping and missing parts, so I didn't want to go that route. I also needed something I could move around without help or a crane. I also wanted a brand with a good reputation. I have other products from Jet and have never been let down. I feel like this saw is as quality as the other Jet tools I own and I think it's going to stay accurate. When I started cutting the rough maple for my entry table I went to install my Freud thin kerf 24 tooth ripping blade I noticed that the riving knife on the saw requested a full kerf blade. Well, off to buy a new blade, I didn't want to risk it, and the old blade probably needed replacing anyway. So with the full kerf equivalent installed I started ripping 4/4 rough maple. There was no bogging down of the motor, the feed rate was comfortable for me, any faster would feel unsafe. Feeding did feel a little slower compared to using the thin kerf on my old job site saw, but the cut quality was much better, surely due to lack of vibration and the ability of the blade to stay at a 0 bevel for the length of the cut. I cut some tenons with the same blade installed and they came out perfect. I then remembered I had a dado blade that I have never been able to use before so I installed it rather quickly, the saw does come with an arbor lock so you only have to use one wrench. Removing the riving knife is also easy due to the quick release on it. The dado blade cut smooth and quick, no bogging down of the motor. After all my cuts were made and the entry table assembled I knew what it felt like to work with an accurate saw. I didn't have to do anything afterwards to make things fit right or be square. After I finished up my table I started work on new cabinets for the shop, I've been using a 50 tooth full kerf combination blade I picked up when I bought the new rip blade. I am not finished with all the cabinets yet, but they are coming together easy, cutting the plywood is like cutting butter and everything is squaring up nicely. I think this is a good quality saw, it's definitely helped make my work better in the few days that I've been using it. A few notes about the saw: As of this writing, zero clearance inserts are not available. The throat plate is rectangle, making inserts isn't impossible but might be challenging due to the plate lock on the saw, and the small nib at the end of the plate. Dust collection works fairly well. I have 1.5HP 1100cm dust collector. Most of the dust goes into the collector, but some does escape through the top, a ZCI would help to reduce this. Some dust also manages to escape through the cutout on the front of the saw for the blade height adjust wheel, I'm searching for a brush seal to help remedy this issue, not much escapes, not enough to cover me in dust anyway, but after cutting for a few hours, a little pile is present. As for the inside of the machine, dust does gather, after three days of constant cutting, there is maybe an inch or so of dust on the bottom of the saw, it will need to be cleaned out frequently. I am considering making a dust slide to the port, similar to what the Proshop One had. The riving knives are for full kerf blades only. The manual needs rewritten. Overall, using the saw is a pleasure, height and bevel wheels turn smooth and easy and stay set when locked in place. It's a good saw for the money. I'd give it 5 stars, but the manual disappointed.

  2. 5.0 out of 5 stars
    by on

    Awsome saw, particularly for the price!

    When I moved to Colorado from Texas, I had to give most of my shop tools to my son-in-law in Illinois. You can’t have a decent shop in an apartment. We finally bought a house last year with a nice 2 car garage and I’ve spent the last year planning my new shop and the tools to go in it and putting back some money every payday. After a lot of research and based with my experience with my old reliable JWTS-10JF, I decided to go with the new Jet Proshop saw. By the time I got ready to order, The Proshop had been replaced with the Proshop II. I ordered my JPS2-115 Proshop II table saw with cast wings and 30 inch fence during the Black Friday sale. I went round and round on the fence but I just don’t have a lot of extra room and really didn’t need the longer fence on my old Jet saw. I also bought the Jet JBM-5 Benchtop Mortiser (still backordered), a Dewalt DW735 Thickness Planer, a Woodworker II blade, and an Incra miter gauge, but more on those when I review those tools. The saw came a week later so I could pick up on my way home from work and I spend that weekend assembling and fine tuning. Unboxing: Ok, we all know this sucker is heavy, particularly for one person to assemble. Shipping weight is close to 300 pounds for all 4 boxes with maybe 240 pounds in the main box. I had great help at Woodcraft loading the 4 boxes and created a nice ramp to slide the main box out of my F-150 and into the garage by myself. Packaging is superb. Box 1 (the main box) is shrink wrapped plastic around a heavy duty, double-walled corrugated board then set on a wooden pallet. Boxes 2 and 3 are the fence/rails. Box 4 is the cast iron wings. I also bought the Jet Mobile Base separately. Assembly: OK, the first thing is to take inventory. Open Box 1 and legs, miter gauge, blade, blade guard, bolts, etc., are in compartments in a heavy foam on top. They even included a few hex wrenches and an open end wrench! For the most part, Jet’s instructions are pretty good. I was able to identify almost everything except for a few screws that appeared to be missing. No worries, Ace is just up the street if they don’t turn up. The saw is shipped resting on the cast iron top inside another heavy foam cushion. I was able to get the saw out of the box and top down on a sheet of cardboard by myself but do not ever want to do that again! Legs are the first to go on and attach with 2 bolts per leg. This part is a LOT easier than my old Jet saw and seems to be a LOT sturdier. Legs on, I assembled the mobile base to fit and with a little help from my wife, turned the saw over to fit in the mobile base. The wings are next to go on followed by the adjusting wheels and the blade guard. Last is the fence but I decided to leave that off. I found the missing screws (for the motor cover) already in the base. Last thing for the day was to remove the Cosmoline from the cast iron and apply some Boeshield before going in for dinner. Adjustments: The next morning was all about leveling the wings and truing the top. First check was getting the blade 90 degrees to the table. It came dead on. Next squaring the blade with the miter slot. I still had my A-Line-It kit from before and went to work on the top. An initial check showed that it was already pretty good – only about .007” out but I knew I could do better. I wanted that perfect saw finish that I know the Woodworker II can produce. Note – the top on this saw is held on with only 3 bolts, not the 4 I was expecting! An hour later, I got it dialed in to less than .001” out. Now for the fence rail assembly and truing up the fence. The fence on the new Jet is really close to the Biesemeyer fence I longed for with my old saw. I dropped the blade and trued up the fence to the same slot I used for the blade. It trues just fine to the end of the blade, but then appears to taper off by about .005”. I’m still playing with it but think this is designed that way as a safety feature to help prevent kickback. Something interesting I’m also playing with. I trued everything to the left miter slot. I think the right slot is not parallel with the left one! I don’t ever use that slot but will let you know. Total start-to-finish time for truing was about 2 hours and a pot of coffee. OK, first impressions. Fit and finish are first rate for a saw of this price. The top is dead flat and the wings are dead flat with the top. Trunnion materials are also good for a saw of this price. It uses a flat drive belt and the motor is totally enclosed in the saw base which contributes to a quieter saw. Much different from my old saw that had the motor hanging out the back driving the blade with a V belt. That alone saved me $50 for a Powertwist Belt. Speaking of noise. The saw is quiet and dead accurate. It definitely passes the coin test. I tested with some 2x10 lumber with rips and cross cuts. There is plenty of horsepower for both. The saw IS only 1.75hp, but that’s all about feed rate and a good, sharp blade. If I were doing production work, I’d have a 3hp cabinet saw. With the enclosed base, dust collection is adequate when hooked up to my Shop-Vac and should be a lot better if Santa brings the dust collection I’ve been hinting at. If there is anything to complain about, I would have to say I’m disappointed in the table insert. Jet decided to go with a rectangular design rather than the rounded ends almost everyone else uses. With the new design, no one makes a zero clearance insert for the thing. I’ve contacted Leecraft and hope they will put this new design on their list. Until then, I’ll make my own. Now I have to go make some more sawdust… :-D

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