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Item 163335
Model 391-55 55L

WoodRiver - Ratcheting Screwdriver Turning Kit

$3.99

Be creative and turn a one-of-a-kind Ratcheting Screwdriver with this kit from WoodRiver®. Kit can easily be turned between centers using any 2" x 2" x 6" stock (sold separately). Prior to turning,...

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Details

Be creative and turn a one-of-a-kind Ratcheting Screwdriver with this kit from WoodRiver®. Kit can easily be turned between centers using any 2" x 2" x 6" stock (sold separately). Prior to turning, bore a 14mm- diameter x 7/8"-deep hole. Once the screwdriver is turned and a finish of your choice has been applied, apply a liberal amount of 5-minute epoxy to the inside lip of the 14mm-diameter hole in the handle, and insert the base of the mechanism. Carefully avoid getting epoxy into the black rim of the ratcheting mechanism and the small hole on the top of the mechanism. We recommend using a small piece of masking tape to cover the hole during the glue-up process. 1/4" bits sold separately.
  • Strong ratcheting action
  • 2" x 2" x 6" turning stock required (sold separately)
  • Kit requires 1/4" driver bits (sold separately)
  • Excellent beginner’s kit
  • Great gift idea

Reviews

5.0 out of 5 stars
1 Review
  1. 5.0 out of 5 stars
    by on

    Nice simple kit. EASY

    About the easiest turning kit there is. Couple of comments: Kit calls for a 2"x2"x6" block of wood. NO ONE uses a screwdriver 2" in diameter, so you can get by easily with probably 1.5" or even 1.25", if you center it carefully. Kit instructions call for a 14mm Forstner bit. Aside from the fact that I don't even SEE a 14mm Forstner sold by Woodcraft, I think that's a mistake. I drilled the hole to 1/2" (12.7mm) to see if it would work. It's a bit smaller than the wings on the shaft of the screwdriver insert (see Woodcraft's photo). But I forced it into the wood a little (I was using Hickory), and pulled it out again. This left 4 grooves in the wood, spaced around the hole. I then used the grooves and a small V-gouge carving tool to make 4 channels down to the bottom of the hole. This allows the insert to be fairly easily pushed into the hole, and has the added benefit of giving more resistance to turning when you glue the insert in. Last, gluing in the insert calls for epoxy. I did a few things to make the bond stronger. 1. I roughed up the metal's surface with coarse sandpaper a bit. 2. Using a popsicle stick, I "wetted" the hole and the insert with a thin layer of epoxy. 3. Being a bit nervous about how brittle the epoxy might be, I mixed in some sawdust with the epoxy to thicken it, then smeared it on the metal insert before putting it into the hole. DO NOT overdo it, as you don't want the epoxy squeezing out of the hole and interfering with the mechanism.

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