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SAS 5140
Item 150706

Adjustable Face Shield

$23.99

In Stock

Adjustable Faceshield is both comfortable and lightweight with ratcheted headpiece for quick adjustment, can flip-up and lock in place and has built in padded sweatband that absorbs perspiration....

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Details

Adjustable Faceshield is both comfortable and lightweight with ratcheted headpiece for quick adjustment, can flip-up and lock in place and has built in padded sweatband that absorbs perspiration. Made of durable poly-carbonate which provides security from flying chips and debris. Meets OSHA and ANSI standards. This faceshield alone does not provide adequate eye protection. It must be worn over suitable safety glasses or goggles.

  • High-Impact Polycarbonate Lens
  • 8” x 15 1/2” , 0.06” Thickness
  • Pre-Injected Curved Lens
  • Locking Adjustable Headpiece
  • Not for Welding

Articles & Blogs

2012woodturning1

The American Association of Woodturners (AAW) held its 26th annual International  Symposium in California’s Silicon Valley this past June at the San Jose McEnery Convention Center.

With over 14,500 members, this international nonprofit organization is dedicated to the advancement of excellence in woodturning with the mission of providing education, inspiration, information, and organization to those interested in the art of traditional woodturning. This show provides the opportunity to learn new techniques, improve skills, and share the knowledge of woodturning.

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20160611 5d 31031 2015 650

Woodcraft donation helps youth learn to turn at American Association of Woodturners International Symposium. 

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Reviews

3.69 out of 5 stars
13 Reviews
  1. 2.0 out of 5 stars
    by on

    Comfortable But Has Poor Longevity

    The plastic thumb nuts and plastic threaded posts which provide the pivoting action for the face shield failed with light use over a 1 year period. Now it constantly flops down, which is annoying when I do use it. It was GREAT until the pivots failed to keep tension. Why couldn't the manufacturer provide steel threads and matching steel nuts at this important wear point? It seems to me both could be injection molded into the plastic much like the knobs used by woodworkers for jig making. This is a comfortable face shield (comfortable eye protection gets worn) and it bugs me that it seems whoever designed it did not care enough to put an effort into making it a great product with longevity. Why can't eye protection be made with premium materials?? Everyones eyeballs deserve top consideration. BTW: my original purchase decision of a face shield was swayed toward buying this product because a replacement lense is readily available from Woodcraft. I am questioning why it is even offered if the product has longevity issues which would tend preclude the need for a new lens. On a bright note, I did get 1 year of eye protection for $23.99. Kind of like paying for insurance...

  2. 2.0 out of 5 stars
    by on

    racheting only worked for a short time

    still works OK if you don't want to tip it up. I used it only a few times before the ratching mechanism was broken.

  3. 5.0 out of 5 stars
    by on

    face and eye protection

    I use the shield when workiing with my lathes. It provides good eye and face protection and it is quite comfortable.

  4. 4.0 out of 5 stars
    by on

    Good Quality

    This shield isn't trying to pull itself off of your head like many of the others I've used over the years--great balance!

  5. 4.0 out of 5 stars
    by on

    REMEMBER - IT''S A FACE SHIELD

    You have to remember this is a face shield. It is to be used in conjunction with safety glasses. It is not designed to protect your eyes it's designed to protect from facial impact. I have been a safety officer for the military for many years and I see people all the time using this with out glasses. This faceshield and the glasses should meet ANSI Standards Z78.1. I couldn't find the ANSI certification in the product information tab but i will be looking for it when it shows up. If it ain't there it's going back. When you by safety equipment the cheep stuff is usually not ANSI inspected that's why the more expensive stuff cost more. I don't beleive it's any kinda law that you need ANSI equipment in your home but if it's good enough for the professional world it's good enough for home use. Look at it this way... You can spend $150.00 on a bowl gogue without any hesitation but freak out when we have to spend [$] on safety equipment to protect our eyes and face. It Dosent have to be stylish.

  6. 5.0 out of 5 stars
    by on

    Comfort

    It made life easy when cutting out a plywood panel in closed quarters.

  7. 3.0 out of 5 stars
    by on

    Working with Lathes and saws

    With Lathes and saws

  8. 1.0 out of 5 stars
    by on

    WORKED OK BUT DID NOT LAST

    THE HEAD BAND CRACKED AT THE PIVOT POINT. DID NOT LAST THAT LONG. PROBABLY USED LESS THAN 10 TIMES. WOULD LOOK FOR SOMETHING BETTER.

  9. 5.0 out of 5 stars
    by on

    A great face shield for the money

    I wish i would have had this on 2 years ago when a piece of maple kicked back off my tablesaw hit me in the face,since then I have slowed down and try to wear safety gear around all equipment.

  10. 4.0 out of 5 stars
    by on

    Try it you won't lose much

    This face shield is inexpensive and yet has all the great features you would need adjustability,replaceable shield,lightweight and best of all well worth the price.

  11. 4.0 out of 5 stars
    by on

    Good safety device

    Good job keeping saw dust from the table saw off your face and out of your eyes especially when you can't use a guard. However, it is no substitute for safe practices and is not meant to be.

  12. 4.0 out of 5 stars
    by on

    Saved my face but not my front tooth

    The lathe threw a log at my face because I was trying to turn a large piece too fast. My face was protected well but the lower part did not do a good job protecting my teeth and mouth. I needed a few stitches and will have to get a crown on a front tooth that was broken in half.

  13. 5.0 out of 5 stars
    by on

    I wear glasses

    wood working Great if you where glasses

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