Latest Articles

Starrett’s new 5-in-1 Combination Protractor was designed to eliminate math and guesswork when cutting angles, and I had the perfect test—helping a friend trim out a fiberglass bathtub in the bathroom of his old farm house.

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While my bandsaw is regularly used for ripping and resawing, having the ability to use smaller blades would certainly increase the tool’s versatility. I prefer the bandsaw over a scrollsaw because it’s faster, capable of sawing thicker stock, and doesn’t pick up the wood and cause it to chatter in mid-cut. However, the problem with using narrow width blades on the bandsaw is that the blade’s teeth can get damaged the second you start the saw, if the metal guides are not set perfectly or mid way into a cut, should the blade deflect into the steel blocks. The Carter Stabilizer solves both problems.

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Squaringup1

Want to be a better woodworker? Start with better wood. Simple but true. The fact is that wood moves. After a few weeks (sometimes days) even the best boards can go bad.

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Blades1

Ever wonder if your table saw blade does what it’s supposed to? Sure, it “cuts,” but is it costing you needless aggravation and added machining? Are you becoming a master at fixing poorly fitting joints and cleaning up rough, burned cuts and tear-out? If so, you’re developing the wrong kind of woodworking habits and wasting valuable shop time. The problem may well be that you’re using the wrong blade.

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Workshop1

Roger McClure’s basement workshop is packed to the rafters (joists, actually) with tools and accessories, but that doesn’t prevent him from keeping a tidy shop. It’s all about using space wisely—and creatively.

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Burnfree1

Watching a choice piece of stock go up in smoke at the table saw shouts that something’s amiss. It’s at this point that you put on your Sherlock Holmes cap and investigate. Is it a dull blade, a crooked fence, bad stock, or some other less obvious culprit lying deeper within the machine itself? Use these checks to find and fix problems, so the next time your sawn edges or ends will look more like white bread than burnt toast.

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Wipeons1

Unless you own a HVLP system and have outfitted your shop with a spray booth, you probably rely on brush-ons and wipe-ons for most of your finishing. And of these two, you may prefer the latter for a few very good reasons. Wipe-ons, specifically, wiping varnishes are perfect for small shops because they apply easily, dry quickly, provide lasting protection, and make wood look terrific. 

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Mirror1

There’s no end to the patterns you can assemble when you glue up contrasting wood scraps into pleasing blanks for these simply turned purse mirrors. They definitely put cheesy plastic compact mirrors to shame. See the “Three Colorful Blank Ideas” sidebar on page 71 for glue-up blank considerations, or choose solid stock such as birds-eye or tiger maple, or fanciful exotics such as zebrawood, bocote, lacewood, or wenge.

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Mailbox1

Be the first on your block to introduce a fun and original way to celebrate the 4th of July, Halloween, Thanksgiving, and the winter holiday season with four festive signs that you can hang from the mailbox stand shown, a lamp-post arm, or by your home’s front door.

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Trestle1

We teamed up with The American Woodshop’s Scott Phillips to create a pleasing table and bench ensemble in an updated Colonial style. As a bonus, we’ve added a deacon’s bench to complement the table in a kitchen setting or serve as a stand-alone piece in a hallway or entry.

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