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Bladesafe1

Woodworkers have a way of collecting table saw blades. It starts innocently enough with an all-purpose blade or two, and before you know it, you’ve added a dedicated ripping blade, a crosscut model, a dado set, and specialty blades for cutting everything from plywood to composite materials and even metal.

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Counterheightstool1

What’s a counter without a stool or two to accompany it? Actually, this stool is more of a stool/chair hybrid with a curved back rest that provides a little support while serving as a convenient handle at the same time. 

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Wcm square

I just read “The 5 Stages of Gluing-Up” on page 72 of the Feb/Mar 2020 issue. It’s perfect. I’m glad to know that I’m not the only one who feels this way. 

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Wcm square

I enjoyed the 3-in-1 Shooting Board article (p. 26) in the April/May 2020 issue. However, as I consider the accuracy of this process, I suspect that the design relies on proper plane adjustment to cut squarely. 

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RIKON’s “new” saw featured in the April/May issue (p. 13) looks a lot like the Craftsman I’ve had for a few years. And I think Ridgid makes one too. 

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For 27 years, the Wharton Esherick Museum in Paoli, PA has sponsored a themed woodworking competition. These juried exhibitions have historically focused on a piece of furniture (a stool, or lamp, for example) that Esherick himself had made. 

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Please use black ink for text and not red or other colors to look trendy. Some sections of the April/May 2020 edition are difficult to read.

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I enjoyed Edwards Smith’s 12 Tips for Success at Craft Shows (issue 93). I’ve been in the craft show circuit for the last few years, and Mr. Smith’s tips are right on. 

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Canarywood2

You don’t have to see a lot of canarywood to know where it got its name. The brightly streaked yellowish/orangeish/reddish/brownish heartwood is reminiscent of many Springtime birds.

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Senatedesk5

On August 24, 1814, the two year-old War of 1812 took a particularly ugly turn when British soldiers torched the U.S. Capitol Building. The conflagration turned marble columns to lime, reduced the new congressional library to ash, and decimated both the House and Senate chambers. As a result, Congress had to convene in temporary quarters for the next five years.

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